The X Files: Revelations

The X Files: Revelations
Six years after the murky search for the truth limped to an increasingly convoluted and ultimately unsatisfying halt, it’s difficult to determine how much goodwill is left for The X Files before the long-awaited second feature film, I Want To Believe, hits theatres. Creator Chris Carter figured audiences could use a fresher course on how much there is to love about The X Files outside of its extensive and foggy mythology about alien abduction, nefarious government projects, implants, questionably fathered offspring and that creepy black oil stuff. I Want To Believe is supposedly a stand-alone, "creature of the month”-type sci-fi horror yarn that relies on the series’ greatest strength: the sizzling chemistry between agents Mulder and Scully. The episodes selected for Revelations strongly support this and are also fantastic examples of how interesting the show was when it explored the actual method of storytelling and didn’t take itself entirely seriously. "Clyde Bruckman’s Final Repose” drops some great possible red herrings on the deaths of our plucky FBI heroes, but is more likely included for its morbid humour. "Post-Modern Prometheus,” a black-and-white tribute to mad scientist films and comics complete with genetic experiments gone wrong and a loveably mutated scapegoat with a Cher fetish, is a series best, skilfully and believably putting its characters to play in an environment very much of the ’30s and bravely breaking the narrative’s continuity as part of the story. This sort of clever and self-aware myth lampooning is part of what drives another major highlight, "Bad Blood.” It’s Gillian Anderson’s favourite episode, as she giddily mentions repeatedly during the "Wondercon Talent Panel” feature, which is about all there is for extras, aside from a trailer for the new movie and short intros to each episode by Carter. If Revelations really is a taste of what sort of tone the team is seeking to establish with the new movie, there will be plenty of reasons to want to believe when it hits theatres. (Fox)