X-Men Origins: Wolverine Gavid Hood

X-Men Origins: Wolverine Gavid Hood
It's a good thing Wolverine has got thick skin to go with his adamantium-infused bones. Ravenous bad press was generated by the production before principal photography had even wrapped. Maybe it was fanboys or critics hoping to chew on some Fox carrion after the studio's Watchmen legal debacle. Or maybe the shiny-clawed one is just about as beloved a character as can be found within the Marvel universe and Brett Ratner had already squandered the goodwill built by Bryan Singer over the first two X-Men features with his abysmal X3: The Last Stand. Most comic geeks are familiar with at least the basic premise of Wolverine's origins but for those drawn in by Hugh Jackman's statuesque brawn and feral charm, director Gavin Hood lays down a liberal adaptation of the graphic novel, Wolverine: Origins. Young Logan and Victor Creed battle through the major wars of American history during the opening credits, establishing their volatile fraternal bond. Eventually the two meet William Stryker and join his elite team of super-powered mercenaries. When innocents become casualties, Logan walks away, retreating to a quiet life in the Canadian Rockies. His peace is soon shattered by vengeance and a mad race through winking plots points and superhero fly-bys that reach a breakneck pace. With so many supers crammed in, half the story feels like a parade of cameos, some better (Ryan Reynolds as Wade Wilson/Deadpool), some serviceable (Taylor Kitsch as Gambit) and some baffling (Tim Pocock as a young Cyclops). The action sequences are kick-ass and clearly shot, and Hugh Jackman is once again excellent as Wolverine. Live Schreiber's portrayal of Sabretooth is vicious, menacing and wounded, exactly what's needed to give his conflict with Wolverine the necessary emotional heft. For features, "Roots of Wolverine" is a jovial conversation on the character's history, with Stan Lee and Len Wein. A standard "Making Of" reveals just how passionate and dedicated Jackman is to the character and the project. The director's commentary trumps the producers' for content and the deleted and alternate scenes include a little set-up scene for the sequel, set to take on Wolverine's time in Japan, which is what fans and crew wanted in the first place. After proving he's not totally mired in a morass of production ineptitude, Wolverine might receive kinder handling when his second solo outing arrives. (Fox)