Who is Clark Rockefeller? Mikael Salomon

Who is Clark Rockefeller? Mikael Salomon
Because other parts of the world manage to make some extremely worthwhile and artistically viable TV movies, I have to believe that there is some American caped crusader running around television movie sets reminding the director that their target demographic eats cheese and marshmallows from an aerosol can. I mean, Kieslowski's Decalogue was made for television, as was von Trier's The Kingdom, and if my second year film theory professor is correct, so was Eyes Without a Face. So, why is it that North American network movies like Who is Clark Rockefeller? are little more than the one-dimensional presentation of the plot machinations on the page and always have to be bio-pics or Dean Koontz adaptations with unobtrusive, high lighting and sub par, has-been actors? Is there really an advertising conspiracy to numb the brains of viewers with a gentle reminder of the status quo to keep them complacent and economically viable? Is there some cackling capitalist villain sitting in a tower maniacally stroking his cat? Since this blasé retelling of con man Christian Karl Gerhartsreider's (Eric McCormack) shenanigans involving the impersonation of a Rockefeller and a 12-year marriage to MBA-toting twit Sandra Boss (Sherry Stringfield) wasn't adapted from a Stephen King novel, it falls into true story territory, being little more than cheap exposition with the heart of a child at the centre. And, yes, the music swells when Gerhartsreider's ten-year-old daughter runs into his arms, professing her love, which really heightens the drama when he kidnaps her and dresses her like a boy to thwart authorities. The rest of the movie has investigators looking at Sherry Stringfield as if she's a crack whore when they find out that she was married to a man for 12 years without realizing that he wasn't who he claimed to be. It has all the cinematic panache of a Rescue 911 re-enactment. No supplements are included with the DVD, which is a shame, since hearing McCormack explain why a con artist has the same mannerisms and body language as Will from Will & Grace would be fascinating. (Sony)