A Walk Into The Sea: Danny Williams And The Warhol Factory Esther B. Robinson

A Walk Into The Sea: Danny Williams And The Warhol Factory Esther B. Robinson
Danny Williams was one of Andy Warhol’s lovers and a promising young filmmaker who disappeared mysteriously in 1966. He was part of the Factory crowd of that era and many of that scene’s survivors appear in this film, from a ghoulish-looking Brigid Berlin to the Velvet Underground’s John Cale.

Their comments say as much about Warhol (manipulative, exploitive, charismatic) as they do Williams, an Ivy League kid who knew how to edit film (according to legendary documentarian Albert Maysles) and light rock shows.

Director Esther B. Robinson is Williams’s niece and her lineage granted her access to some hard-to-find people and rare Factory footage (including an early snippet of the Velvets). As well, she creates an effective, moody atmosphere. Unfortunately, her closeness also dulls her critical eye. A Walk Into The Sea is a long film — too long for a peripheral character like Williams. Sure, he was a talented editor and a decent fellow but he was a ancillary player at best.

A Walk Into The Sea is more likely to appeal to Warhol scholars than the casual filmgoer. (Thatgrl)