Walk All Over Me Robert Cuffley

Walk All Over Me Robert Cuffley

Bereft of preamble, Walk All Over Me sketches out its thinly stretched plot and characters on the fly. Leelee Sobieski plays the vaguely downtrodden heroine, Alberta, a convenience store clerk who ditches her job and an abusive relationship after her boyfriend gets her involved with some small town gangsters and money goes missing. Before there’s much sense of who these characters are or why it’s so imperative she flees so suddenly, Alberta’s on the nearest bus, which happens to be headed across the country to Vancouver.

Director Robert Cuffley uses the bus ride as a great excuse to imbed the opening credits with a strong sense of hope in the journey via a musical selection by Bell Orchestre. Once in Vancouver, Alberta looks up the one person she knows in the city, her former baby sitter Celene (Battlestar Galactica’s Tricia Helfer), who happens to pay the bills as a professional dominatrix now. Celene reluctantly accepts the burden of sheltering Alberta, who is obviously enthralled with her old sitter’s exotic, and lucrative, lifestyle. Of course, she can’t resist trying on the clothing and consequently, the whole act after her grocery clerk job doesn’t offer her the kind of cash necessary to replace the costly garments she ruins while playing dress up.

Alberta picks the seemingly least threatening of Celen’s video suitors, a cute young man named Paul, to test her aptitude for kink control on. Their playful yet awkward exchange leads to a missing money crime caper that pretty much co-opts the whole "posing as a dominatrix” story.

While that swerve introduces much needed zany energy from Jacob Tierney, Michael Eklund and Michael Adamthwaite, as the bumbling muscle and their suave leader, it also negates any semblance of this being Alberta’s story, and Leelee isn’t a strong enough presence to anchor this meandering exercise in faux-edgy comedic mishaps. (Mongrel Media)