Viva La Bam: The Complete First Season

Viva La Bam: The Complete First Season
When Jackass ended its life with arguably the funniest motion picture ever, something had to be done by the cast members whose last names weren't Knoxville. Chris Pontius and Steve-O went the Wildboyz route and Bam Margera, well, he took everyone else with him back to his house to meet his parents. Created and produced by Margera, Viva is simply a day in the life of Bam tormenting his parents (April and Phil) at their home in Pennsylvania. Not wandering far off the Jackass path of pranks and stupid stunts, Viva centres on the personal life of its subjects, so yes, Bam keeps it in the family. Oddly enough, the first episode, "Phil's Hell Day/Bam's Skate Park," is easily the show's greatest achievement. First, organising a day devoted to only torturing Phil (i.e., ironing hamburgers onto every item of his clothing) and second, sending his naïve parents to Atlantic City while he installs a full skate park inside their home. The pranks are fun, but it's mostly April's shock and Phil's nonchalance that make it so good. Bam is given a lot of leniency in what he does, converting the home into a castle (complete with a moat and drawbridge at the front door), forcing his dad on a hunger strike, in which he calls up every restaurant, posters every wall and hires every billboard in the city to make sure it happens, and organising a Turbonegro concert in the living room. However, some of the best moments are when Bam and his friends turn on each other. Most memorable is when they blindfold the mustard-hating Rake and switch the piñata he's about to hit with a beehive, resulting in one hell of a funny sting-fest, or when they vacuum the sleeping face of Brandon and convince him to put his shoes on, just after they dumped tacks into them. Silly? Yes. Immature? Of course! And if this sounds good, the extras do a fine job keeping the laughs coming. The "uncommon-tary" features the whole cast together, uncut, all talking at once, occasionally farting and providing new insight into the footage. The deleted scenes are more than you can imagine and even humanise the characters a bit, if that's even possible. Plus: music videos, scavenger hunt list, more. (MTV/Paramount)