The Tudors: Season Two [Blu-ray]

The Tudors: Season Two [Blu-ray]
Examining a time in history when church and state met, fought, flipped each other the bird and cut off a bunch of heads in the process, The Tudors proves to be a thoroughly entertaining romp through 16th century British histrionics, unorthodox coital partnerships and ideological bullying. While suffering from some occasional linguistic anachronisms (Henry VIII likely would have referred to Anne Boleyn as a "tavern wench” or "quinny” rather than a "fucking bitch”), season two of the wonderfully stylized corset drama more closely follows historical text than the first but speeds through months and years at an exponentially greater speed, occasionally begging the question, "where did that big pregnant belly come from?” This is a minor quibble, however, as the show continues to make historical drama and known facts seem entirely urgent, fresh and emotionally dynamic despite being slightly less clever and sinfully passive-aggressive than it could be. What it does do well is point out the utter absurdity in the societal championing of dominant philosophies, be they religious or governmental. This is a lesson that modern folk would do well to take heed of, as we essentially behave in the same manner as our predecessors but have evolved in a manner that creates arbitrary laws and social discrimination, rather than the more overt decapitations. The second season of The Tudors starts with King Henry VIII (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) dissolving Roman Catholicism in England so that he may rightfully fornicate with Anne Boleyn (a fantastic Natalie Dormer), in the hopes of popping out a male heir to the throne. This pisses off the Pope (Peter O’Toole), in addition to a bunch of God-fearing Luddites, including Thomas More (Jeremy Northam), who is eventually beheaded for not supporting the King. After Anne is unable to produce a bouncing baby boy, Henry grows tired of her and starts dipping his pen in the community ink. The Blu-ray set includes three brief featurettes about Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Peter O’Toole and the sexuality on display in the series. Interviews with various professors (theoretical idealists) throughout prove informative and appropriate given the subject matter, despite the overuse of the word "Mercurial” (a polite euphemism for psychotic). (Peace Arch)