Transformers: Dark of the Moon 3D [Blu-ray] Michael Bay

Transformers: Dark of the Moon 3D [Blu-ray] Michael Bay
Since the third instalment of Transformers – wherein the Autobots and Decepticons race to claim a Cybertronian spacecraft hidden on the moon with the aid, or hindrance, of annoying humans – is ostensibly just more of the same incoherent crap and bad storytelling that made the first two films so laughable, the only selling feature and distinction is the 3D. Despite not having any idea how to create a cohesive narrative, Michael Bay at least had the good sense to film this entire visual effects extravaganza with 3D equipment (unlike most 3D productions, where only ten-percent of the film is shot with 3D equipment), making it an aesthete's wet dream, amidst the inexplicable slow motion shots, choppy editing and inconsistent perspective. This is why this particular set, which includes the 3D version of the film, along with over three hours of supplemental material, is a must-have for anyone keen on the franchise or visual effects, trumping the cash-grab Blu-Ray that was released just before Christmas, which literally just had the 2D film with no supplements. Looking fantastic in HD, with a constant clear dimension throughout the entire film, Dark of the Moon proves almost watchable, if only for the third act destruction sequence where Chicago is decimated. Even better is the two-hour "making of" documentary included with the set, which details the use of 3D equipment, shooting in various locations throughout the U.S. (Chicago, Detroit, Washington), the helicopter jump sequence and the different approach to making this entry. What becomes clear throughout, despite the cutesy marketing veneer of the doc, is that Bay is a megalomaniac that makes the lives of those around him as difficult as possible. He comes to the set each day with no clear vision of what he plans to do, not having storyboards or any sort of thematic trajectory in mind, leaving him to change scenes and sequences last minute, much to the chagrin of every department. And where most directors come to set prepared to shoot a scene they've planned ahead of time, allowing their focus to rest on positioning and coaching the actors, Bay actually interferes with their performances by making the scene about his emotional connection, denying their requests to listen to music that might put them in the appropriate headspace. This fascinating watch has far more intrigue and subtlety than the actual film. Also included is a mini-doc about the NASA program and various art galleries. (Paramount)