Traitor Jeffrey Nachmanoff

Traitor Jeffrey Nachmanoff
With considerably more accurate intel than the majority of recent political thrillers that have dipped into global terrorism territories, Traitor is, if nothing else, respectable, mature and intelligent, despite its many shortcomings from both a narrative and structural standpoint. Prosaic cinematic treatment with absolutely no sense of humour and characterizations defined by religious ideals juxtaposed with political realities belabour an already too familiar, and sadly realistic, story. Despite the amount of care taken in portraying various cultures and ideologies in an accurate and respectful light, they still exist within the vacuum of stereotype and expectation. Within this, however, are some thoughtful and credible performances mixed with propulsive direction that makes the film highly watchable, if forgettable. The title, Traitor, refers to U.S. Special Operations officer Samir Horn (Don Cheadle), a Muslim working with a terrorist cell on a plot to blow up a series of Greyhounds on the American Thanksgiving. While the film deliberately obfuscates Samir's loyalties, at least initially for dramatic ire, F.B.I. agent Roy Clayton (Guy Pearce) is unsure what to think, as he investigates and tries to prevent the terrorist act from coming about. Included with the DVD is a commentary track with director Jeffrey Nachmanoff and lead actor Don Cheadle where they discuss guerrilla filmmaking tactics, filming in Morocco, much of the stunt work, which Cheadle did himself, and the likelihood of people buying this DVD on the streets of Bangkok. Also included are brief featurettes on both the stunts and the locations, which are both highly sound-tracked, brief edits of behind-the-scenes footage. Strangely, the exotic locations featurette focuses all of its energy on the wonder and amazement of Morocco, rather than the subtle mystique of the many Toronto locales used for shooting.
(Alliance)