Trailer Park Boys: Countdown to Liquor Day Mike Clattenburg

Trailer Park Boys: Countdown to Liquor Day Mike Clattenburg
Canada's favourite trailer-trash comedy troupe have capped their nearly decade-long run with this second feature film offshoot of the faux-reality series. Ricky, Julian and Bubbles get released from prison after the events of the still unreleased TV special, Say Goodnight to the Bad Guys, to find Sunnyvale trailer park a mostly abandoned junk heap. Jim Lahey, in a liquor-free spell during the Boys' incarceration, bought the park and additional land from his ex-wife, built "Lahey Luxury Estates" and moved the Sunnyvale residents into the new digs. The problem: Julian's trailer is in the way of the sewer line to the new park, and he's intent on converting it into a legitimate auto body business. Lahey tries to convince Julian to move to the new park, but tensions boil over after Bubbles discovers that Lahey boarded up his kitty door and called in a complaint to the SPCA while he was in jail. The hysterical stupidity mounts with a battle of hair shaving, Lahey rebounding violently to the bottle, Randy hooking for cheeseburgers, Alex Lifeson of Rush as an undercover cop in drag, more wacky pot growing schemes from Ricky and the ridiculous evolution of J-Roc's rap persona. Most of the minor characters from the series get only a morsel of screen time, but there's more material with Sarah, Lucy and Cyrus in the deleted scenes. Except for shitty audio on a few, the deleted scenes contain some classic moments, like Ricky tricking a bunch of brain-dead security guards into arresting some hunters who were trying to stop the Boys from robbing a liquor store. An alternate ending gives the series a slightly different sense of closure, but no more or less to really make a difference. Only Bubbles and J-Roc feel like they've finally gotten somewhere by the end ― the rest seem destined to repeat their laughably sad cycles. Features on Randy's hair and the car chase are decent, but "Sunnyvale Stories," a behind-the-scenes look a filming with the whole cast fully in character, is exactly the kind of attention this package could've used more of. Completely shirking commentary track duties, director Mike Clattenburg enlists three members of The Trailer Park Boys message board to provide boring, uninformative conversation instead of using anyone actually involved in the production. While their core audience would love to watch these loveable jerks get up to debased hijinks indefinitely, it feels like the TPB are ready to put away the rum glass, track pants and glasses. Goodnight, my favourite shit-clowns. (Alliance)