There's Still a "Radical Underrepresentation" of Women in Hollywood, Study Finds

The number of female directors in the Top 250 domestic grossing films of 2018 dipped to just 8 percent
There's Still a "Radical Underrepresentation" of Women in Hollywood, Study Finds
While the past year brought widespread attention to gender inequality in film, a new U.S. study finds that there is much more progress to be made going forward.

The 21st annual Celluloid Ceiling report — released by the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University — found that the number of female directors in the Top 250 domestic grossing films of 2018 dipped to 8 percent, down 3 points from 2017. That number also sits lower than the 9 percent level achieved in 1998.

However, women made gains in other roles for the same 250 titles, making up 20 percent of all directors, writers, producers, executive directors, editors and cinematographers. That number rose two points from 2017.

Researchers noted that the largest gains were among writers (16 percent, up 5 percentage points from 2017) and producers (21 percent, up 5 percentage points from 2017).

"The study provides no evidence that the mainstream film industry has experienced the profound positive shift predicted by so many industry observers over the last year," executive director and study author Martha Lauzen told the Associated Press.

"This radical underrepresentation is unlikely to be remedied by the voluntary efforts of a few individuals or a single studio," Lauzen said. "Without a large-scale effort mounted by the major players — the studios, talent agencies, guilds and associations — we are unlikely to see meaningful change. The distance from 8 percent to some semblance of parity is simply too vast."

You can read the entire report here.