Surfer, Dude S.R. Bindler

Surfer, Dude S.R. Bindler
Stylistically and structurally very similar to the Hilary Duff and Ashlee Simpson epics Raise Your Voice and Undiscovered, which both felt incomplete, accidental and unfinished, Surfer, Dude very well may be the worst film of 2008, and quite possibly of the decade, aside from Crash. It will come as no surprise to anyone that a movie starring Matthew McConaughey, Woody Harrelson and Willie Nelson would feature weed in just about every scene. However, it seems that the sparks were flying behind-the-scenes as well, with five-minute boobie montages, incoherent storylines, characters that disappear and dreadful cinematography. Quite frankly, fully articulating the sheer ineptitude demonstrated on every level of this production would be a cruel and redundant task, as the plotline speaks for itself. Steve Addington (Matthew McConaughey), a perpetually stoned surfer, returns to Malibu for a summer of catching waves, only to discover that reality TV goons have replaced his previous corporate sponsors. Along with his agent/toke-buddy (Woody Harrelson), Steve becomes disillusioned with the surfer reality TV show he has inadvertently become a part of while screwing some executive's daughter (Alexie Gilmore). At some point Willie Nelson shows up with a herd of sheep, as does Scott Glenn, with some ridiculous insights about surfing, which, like everything else, have no context or purpose. Truthfully, the only reason anyone might want to see this is for some McConaughey nudity and an endless parade of bare bosoms, in case they do not yet know how to operate Google. Included with the DVD is a lengthy "making of" and a commentary, which are extremely depressing, as they discuss the seven-year process of getting this film made, along with how well everyone got on (well, yeah, they were all stoned all the time). Also included are deleted scenes and a 12-episode webisode series, which is about as exciting as the film. Had the gang watched the episode of The Sarah Silverman Show where she learned the valuable lesson of not making important decisions while high this entire ordeal could have been avoided. (Paradox)