Sugarhouse Gary Love

Sugarhouse Gary Love
Apparently, the play Collision, on which Sugarhouse is based, was enjoyed by audiences when it ran, suggesting that the implausible confessionals and the trite trivialization of other people's emotions work better in a small room. It is easy to see why, as the film version feels like little more than a three-person play with a dash of gratuitous violence to keep fans of British crime thrillers engaged. The gist of the film is simple, with Tom (Steven Mackintosh) attempting to purchase a gun from a derelict crack addict (Ashley Walters), who apparently stole said gun from a local crime lord named Hoodwink (Andy Serkis), whose head-to-toe tattoos look far from realistic. Along the way, we learn that the only thing lower than a homeless crack addict thief is a homosexual, in addition to some truly ignorant wisdom about the tragedy of one meaning less when compared to the more serious tragedy of another, because people are apparently all the same — except gays. When not beating the crap out of one other or slashing each other with machetes, these three characters deliver sob stories and behaviour justifications in spades. If it weren't so boring, it would be funny. Little to no style exists to boost the flimsy narrative and the entire gamut of rule association and rebellion is ignored (likely out of sheer ignorance) in lieu of a great deal of unintentional homoerotic tension, which is amusing, especially considering how hateful and juvenile the surface narrative is. At the end of the day, the only lesson learned is that rich people should apparently hang out with urine-soaked drug addicts before they kill themselves in order to gain perspective on things. Genius. Included with the DVD are brief interviews with all of the lead actors and the director, in addition to a set tour with a particularly exuberant Ashley Walters. (Seville)