Species III Brad Turner

Species III Brad Turner
Everybody's favourite misogynist franchise returns for a lukewarm, straight-to-video retread. Natasha Henstridge's alien has been superseded by "daughter" Sunny Mabrey and the doctors in charge (science prof Robert Knepper and grad student Robin Dunne) are less obviously malevolent, but the game is still the same: fear the reproductive woman and tame her mysterious body. The wrinkle this time proves to be that of the half-aliens/half-humans whose immune systems have a habit of breaking down, thus Mabrey must be kept from reproducing with humans, which either isn't a problem because of her will to survive or is because, well, I don't know. To be honest, the pseudo-scientific mumbo-jumbo caused my eyes to glaze over several times, but it doesn't really matter because the spectacle of two males trying to deal with overpowering a female's nature is enough to give women's studies majors serious nightmares. The introduction of a bad alien hottie late in the game blows whatever condescending sympathy has been garnered for our heroine and the climax suggests that the only good woman is the one that defeats her own nature — so much for the concept of "our bodies, our selves." Species-heads take note: the disc has several bonus features. First is a commentary with director Brad Turner, writer Ben Ripley and actor Dunne (where's Mabrey?); it's a melange of semi-interesting technical information, wild enthusiasm over aesthetic banalities and delusional bull about the film's feminism. Meanwhile, a basic "making of" featurette is full of vague generalisations and gratuitous back-patting but it paves the way for the remaining three featurettes, which surprise with some fascinating technical detail. A "behind the scenes" photo gallery rounds out the package. (MGM)