The Shawshank Redemption Frank Darabont

The Shawshank Redemption Frank Darabont
Perhaps the most accomplished filmic adaptation of writer Stephen King's work (standing alongside the equally celebrated Stand By Me, Carrie, Kubrick's The Shining and Pet Sematary), The Shawshank Redemption (adapted from a novella that originally appeared in King's 1982 collection Different Seasons) is finally given the two-disc special edition treatment on the ten-year anniversary of its first theatrical run. The now-revered film slipped under most of the general public's radar in 1994, when the unfortunate combination of its unmemorable title and the fact that it was widely perceived to be a "prison movie" conspired against it during a season of mostly feel-good blockbusters. When box office receipts failed to recoup the investment, it seemed inevitable that it would quietly fade into celluloid history, that is until it garnered seven Academy Award nominations and simultaneously began flying off video store shelves. Shawshank is the story of the enigmatic Andy Dufresne (Tim Robbins) as told through the eyes of fellow inmate and friend Red (Morgan Freeman) over the period of the 20 years the pair did hard time together. Part of the remarkable staying power of this movie is derived from the three universal themes contained within it: friendship, struggle and hope. Freeman and Robbins' onscreen chemistry is palpable, their performances equally so (Freeman earned an Academy Award nomination for his role). The special edition DVD ships with a bevy of bonus features sure to satisfy any discerning fan of Shawshank. On disc one, along with a widescreen presentation of the film, is director/screenwriter Frank Darabont's commentary track. Disc two houses two documentaries, which discuss everything from the importance of story to the task of casting and the aforementioned box office woes to more philosophical views, where Shawshank serves as something of a religious allegory. If all this isn't enough, there's also a segment from The Charlie Rose Show were Daramont, Robbins and Freeman are reunited to discuss the project ten years later, a comic spook of the film entitled The Sharktank Redemption, as well as a stills and storyboard gallery. (Warner)