Scrubs: The Complete Fifth Season

Scrubs: The Complete Fifth Season
Unless it is salvaged from the damning mediocrity that filled its sixth season, Scrubs will unfortunately be remembered as a show that flourished for only five seasons. (Though his sagging film career might be the reason for it, Zach Braff surprisingly signed on for a seventh stint with a whopping salary increase, meaning the show’s constantly up-in-the-air future is in fine form with the networks.) The fifth season unfolds as the most developmentally significant for nearly every character, with the exception of the always-enigmatic Janitor. J.D. (Braff) macks on Mandy Moore’s klutz-y character, who persuades him to buy an acre of land, which ends up hosting gay porch parties in his absence. He also finds what might be true love — finally — in Kim (Elizabeth Banks), a resident doctor he notices when he discovers she’s divorced. It’s this relationship that leaves the season hanging from a cliff and eventually drags down part of the sixth. Elsewhere, Carla and Turk discover she’s pregnant, which turns their world upside down, while Elliott begins dating Keith the intern, an arc that reveals just how kinky the "blonde doctor” really is. Perhaps the biggest development is with the self-righteous Dr. Cox, who shows his vulnerable side when he loses a string of patients and falls into unexpected depression. While the more adult arcs are a nice change from the frivolous storylines of prior seasons, what Scrubs does best — in-jokes and absurd fantasy segments — isn’t overlooked. There’s a The Wizard of Oz homage where the movie’s themes fall into place, Turk’s impressive audition (Bell Biv Devoe’s "Poison”) to join the Janitor’s air band, the zinging catch phrases of "Kelly Ripa” and "zoom zoom” and best of all, J.D.’s recurring ideas of "floating head doctor,” where his body and head detach so he can be in two places at once. Not to mention Dr. Acula, the low budget film he’s producing, directing and co-starring in about, you guessed it, a vampire doctor. Like all of Scrubs’ seasons, the DVD is short on substance, as far as the extras go. A recap of life on the set makes up one featurette, which feels like déjà vu from the prior seasons, while an extended version of the 100th episode, directed by Braff, is also included. (Buena Vista)