The Riches Season 2

The Riches Season 2
People are pretty disgusting when it comes to money. And while it's amusing to watch people measure themselves by their accumulations and the amount of checkmarks on an ever-banal list of robotic achievements, it is also quite terrifying to see how low someone will sink for a bloody buck. This is part of the beauty of The Riches, a show that looks at "buffers" (those who relentlessly consume and never give anything back) from the outside and finds an idyllic glee in pointing out how stupid and predictable they are. While the first season explored the relative ease a family of travelling con artists have in literally stealing the American dream, the second season examines how that very dream, in turn, steals them. Patriarch Wayne Malloy (Eddie Izzard), gaining comfort in his role as a lawyer, claims that the family need to only "hang in there" for a short time, as he has a 150 million dollar real estate deal on the line that will solve all their problems, allowing collective retirement. The only snag is that this deal involves stabbing a friend (Gregg Henry) in the back and exploiting Hurricane Katrina victims. Dahlia (Minnie Driver) struggles morally with a lifetime of lying and vows to make good on her parole, leading to a drug relapse. Meanwhile, eldest son Cael (Noel Fisher) rejects their new life, citing heartless assimilation on the part of his family, and daughter Di Di (Shannon Marie Woodward) takes further steps towards "fitting in," as does the youngest transvestite son (Aidan Mitchell). The question of whether Wayne Malloy is a pioneer in pointing out how absurd and arbitrary "success" really is or just another victim of greed and corruption remains at the core of the show, keeping things both discerning and entertaining. With top-notch performances and a genuinely intelligent storyline, it's a shame that the series was cancelled after only seven-episodes of its second season. Fans should still check out the second season, however, as the final episode may very well be the best of the entire run. Included with the DVD set is a brief featurette on Eddie Izzard, where he discusses tackling a dramatic role. (Fox)