Resident Evil: Extinction Russel Mulcahy

Resident Evil: Extinction Russel Mulcahy

The third and supposedly final live-action Resident Evil film, Extinction diverges ever further a field of the videogame series’ established mythos but manages to turn in the franchise’s most satisfying zombie slaying romp. Bringing the convoluted story to its natural grandiose conclusion, the T-Virus has spread beyond the walls of Raccoon City to infect the majority of the planet, creating a delightfully campy mash-up of Dawn of the Dead and Road Warrior. Alice (Milla Jovovich), Resident’s superhuman heroine, has been playing lone wolf of the desert while avoiding satellite tracking by the Umbrella Corporation, the nasty suits responsible for the viral outbreak. During her travels, Alice happens upon Claire Redfield (Heroes hottie Ali Larter) and her convoy, a much-anticipated character by the avid gamer contingent insistent upon connections to the game. Alice busts out some vicious telekinesis to protect Claire and her band of survivors from a flock of mutated crows and informs the group of possible sanctuary in Alaska. Numerous partially developed plot threads are introduced and abandoned, but who in their right mind is expecting smooth storytelling from the third film in a video game adaptation? Paul W.S. Anderson, perhaps the ultimate well-meaning hack, creator and writer of the Resident Evil film series, and director of the first Resident Evil movie, seems to understand his limitations enough to have hired Russel Mulcahy to direct this finale. The man was responsible for the first two Highlanders and The Shadow, proof that his capabilities with B-grade sci-fi action thrills are comparable to his inability to piece together a coherent story. With more gore, by the bucket load, and far more kinetically and visually satisfying, Resident Evil: Extinction exceeds the modest expectations set by its predecessors in the "videogame to film” world. Most of the deleted scenes were wisely cut, though some fill a few gaping plot holes, and the commentary track is your basic writer/director discussion. However, the "making of” is fairly informative and quite revealing of Paul W.S. Anderson’s self-awareness and reverence for the source material. Extra bonus: a sneak peek at Resident Evil: Degeneration, an upcoming CGI instalment. (Sony)