Rescue Me: The Complete First Season

Rescue Me: The Complete First Season
When the critically-acclaimed ABC series The Job was given its walking papers, creators and executive producers Peter Tolan and Denis Leary quickly jumped into their next project, one that was near and dear to Leary's heart. Rescue Me is dramatic comedy set in the firehouse of Engine 62 in NYC in the aftermath of 9/11. In the opening seconds of the pilot episode, Tolan and Leary make it clear that this is a show centred on the permanent effects of the 2001 tragedy on the surviving firemen. Leary also portrays the lead character, Tommy Gavin, a heroic daredevil fire-fighter, a failing recovering alcoholic, a womaniser and a divorced father of three. His biggest problem, however, is the ghosts he's constantly faced with, primarily the one of his cousin, whom he lost in 9/11. Throughout the season, his visitors push Tommy into a series of fuck-ups and eventually lead to the serious injury of a co-worker and the questioning of his mental stability. The supporting cast couldn't be more talented; Leary is assisted by a smorgasbord of colourful characters, both in his firehouse and in his personal life (his ex-wife, his father and uncle, and his various mistresses). Though Gavin is the prime focus, the writers give the ensemble cast their share of storylines, often dividing the plot into many different directions, both heartfelt and hilarious. Most entertaining is the intimate banter and antics of the fire fighters in their comfort of their workplace; they're constantly competing with each other (a penis measuring contest), laying down house rules (a no use of the word "metrosexual" policy or having sexual relations with a widow) and of course, playing gags on the newbies. Four featurettes are included to divulge the origins of the show, including analyses with Leary and Tolan on the creation of the show (Leary was inspired by the death of his cousin in 9/11), the varied personalities of the characters and incorporating certain stylistic elements and the real life input from fire fighters and their families. Plus: pilot and finale commentaries, bloopers and deleted scenes. (Columbia/Sony)