Remember Me Remember Me

Remember Me Remember Me
While taking every opportunity to cash in on the current Twilight hysteria by casting vampire heartthrob Robert Pattinson in the main role, Remember Me is a film that also says something. It sheds light on the twisted way in which tragedy strains relationships, yet at the same time draws people closer to each other. Set in 2001, NYC college students Tyler (Pattinson) and Ally (Emilie de Ravin, Lost) have both suffered familial tragedy and it's what connects them as love interests. However, they deal with their grief very differently, as rebellious Tyler aimlessly wanders through life, having issues with his father (Pierce Brosnan), a high-powered businessman, while Ally, his complete opposite, lives life to the fullest. At first, Ally presents the perfect opportunity for Tyler to get back at her cop father for roughing him up. But, as this is a romantic drama, the two begin to fall in love once they get to know each other and understand each other's pain. However, their relationship is threatened when initial intentions become known, and they must get past the circumstances that threaten to tear them apart. The plot of the film isn't that exciting, but Remember Me is more about character development. Because of Ally, Tyler goes from being an angry, self-destructive miscreant to a young man who finds new possibilities for happiness. Remember Me is about young, passionate love, the strength of family and the difficulties endured, but the bigger picture surrounding is also of importance; it gives a face and identity to an otherwise statistical event in recent significant history. The moral of the story is live every day to the fullest while treasuring the people you have in your life because you never know when tragedy will strike, and in this movie it's pretty often. While Remember Me doesn't have the same feel as Twilight, "twihearts" can take comfort in watching a film that is predominantly Pattinson. And let's face it, the only people seeing this are Pattinson fans, and they won't be disappointed. DVD special features include an audio commentary with director Allen Coulter and the cast, as well as a "making of" feature. (E1)