Puppy Kieran Galvin

Puppy Kieran Galvin
As far as irresponsible love stories go, Puppy is a surprisingly affecting and thoughtful exploration of two somewhat lugubrious and lonely individuals trapped in unusual circumstances. Plot-holes are evident and some points are glossed over with minimal footage and exploration but the central relationship of the film is handled in a manner that manages to be both disturbing and believable. Given the alternative, sacrificing the simple machination for the sake of maintaining naturalistic and thematically satisfying character trajectories seems like the appropriate route to take. Puppy follows Lizzie (Nadia Townsend) after she accidentally runs over the family dog with her car and pawns her sister’s jewellery in an effort to pay the vet bill. As this isn’t the first disappointment Lizzie has inflicted on those around her, she is again isolated and rejected, which leaves her feeling unworthy of life and deciding to pull a Sylvia Plath in her car. Aiden (Bernard Curry) discovers her unconscious body and decides to take her home and tie her to his bed. It becomes clear early on that he suffers from a severe form of dementia, believing his captive to be Helen (Susan Ellis), his missing wife. What follows is a cat-and-mouse game between the two as Lizzie attempts to manipulate her mentally ill captor into untying her and leaving the house for long periods of time. This isn’t difficult for her, since Aiden really has no intention of inflicting harm, wanting more so to be loved and understood. In fact, aside from a misguided attempt to clear a blockage in Lizzie’s birth canal with a vacuum cleaner hose, he genuinely seems to care for her in his own distorted way. Suggesting that their connection is simply Stockholm syndrome-related would be to ignore the careful mirroring and mutual understandings that have been constructed in the film, seeing that their failures and world disappointments are similar, as is the way they have been treated by an uncaring majority. This might be why Puppy works despite the implausible way a police investigation is handled later in the film and the problems that arise when Helen shows up again. The DVD comes with no special features, which, given the late acquisition for North American distribution of the film, is unsurprising. (Dokument)