Prom Night Nelson McCormick

Prom Night Nelson McCormick
Much like the appalling sequels that followed, Prom Night only shares the title and big event with the 1980 cult classic, which is almost a pat on the back for the studio, considering it decided not to stick to the same old remake formula. Almost. Instead, McCormick and his team eschew the original’s story for a much more relevant PG-13 version to appease the teenage set. After her obsessive high school teacher (Jonathan Schaech) killed her family, Donna (Brittany Snow) now lives in fear despite the killer being in custody. As prom night comes, everything seems perfect, aside from the spine-chilling nightmares and well, the fact that the psychopath after her has escaped. Funny that. From there it becomes the rigmarole any person with half a brain would expect from a modern-day slasher: the cops (including The Wire’s Idris Elba) are brought in, the friends are mostly offed and our villain somehow moves with ninja-like stealth until he reaches his target. As much as I abhor the thought of yet another Hollywood rehash of a beloved horror flick, Prom Night’s poor decision was in not remaking Paul Lynch’s film and trying to make something new of the premise. McCormick presents yet another glossy, formulaic, lifeless thriller for The Hills generation, putting more effort into casting pretty young things than making this film at all viewable. To think he passed up on one of horror’s finest opening sequences — the fucking creepy game of hide and seek gone wrong — is a testament to his incompetence as a filmmaker. The commentary with McCormick, Snow and Schaech is a nauseating experience to sit through, hearing them speak as if their work has any merit, while the extremely pointless alternate ending and run-of-the-mill deleted scenes only drag on the horror of watching more Prom Night. Plus: featurettes, yearbook. (Alliance)