Priest [Blu-Ray] Scott Charles Stewart

Priest [Blu-Ray] Scott Charles Stewart
Were I being gracious, I'd question the complicity of the filmmakers in Priest's humour, but there's overwhelming evidence that the team behind Legion really don't know what they're doing. Watching the "Making Of" features, impressions that this barely coherent hodgepodge of ideas is the product of a "That looks cool! Let's do that!" mentality are confirmed when director Scott Charles Stewart admits of some of the gadgets, "It doesn't make a lot of sense, but it was just so cool!" And in the film's commentary, "I don't know if it was the right idea, but it was an idea." Regardless of whether the Korean graphic novels Priest is adapted from handle the medley of retro-futurist ideas with more ingenuity, this iteration is clumsy and derivative. Functioning as an enhanced exposition scroll, an animated history gets us up to speed with a rather dense mythology. Centuries of battle between feral vampire beasts and ambiguously super-powered members of the clergy have led to the church walling people inside of large industrial cities, perpetuating an Orwellian illusion that evil has been defeated. Most amusing of the notions in this dystopian cityscape are confessional booths containing looped recordings of stock scripture and penance conditions. Unfortunately, that minor irreverence borrowed from Max Headroom rarely extends to any other areas of this cliché-riddled script. A guilt-ridden, but unflappable, priest (Paul Bettany) calls bullshit on the church's ostrich-defence policy regarding the existence of vampires, going rogue to save a young girl (Lily Collins) kidnapped as a means of prodding old wounds. Along the way, he teams up with a rash young sheriff (Cam Gigandet) from an anachronistic desert town and a boink-interest priestess (Maggie Q) to battle a villain literally known as ― I shit you not ― "Black Hat." Betraying few human characterizations and the most basic of motivations ― redemption versus revenge ― the characters function only to move the frail story between moderately entertaining, spatially ambiguous action sequences with poorly defined physics and back stories and ideological positions that have little impact. Paul Bettany has an uncanny ability to not come across like an idiot in these types of things, but Stewart marks himself as culpable in crimes against consideration. As little care to succeed beyond the broadest of beats is taken with the features as with the film itself. Some poorly labelled and utterly unessential extra scenes join "Bullets & Crucifixes: Picture in Picture Experience" ― in which mostly pointless observations pop up at random, with no skip function or menu while you watch the movie ― as the worst use of Blu-Ray space I've had the displeasure of experiencing. Oh, and there's a trailer for videogame Twisted Metal Uncut. Why? Because it looks cool, why else? (Sony)