POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold [Blu-Ray] Morgan Spurlock

POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold [Blu-Ray] Morgan Spurlock
In case the title, POM Wonderful promotion and many appearances by Morgan Spurlock on various talk shows wearing a NASCAR-inspired suit of logos didn't make it clear, this latest slice of pseudo-edutainment gimmickry from the Super Size Me director is an attempted deconstruction of product placement that uses said marketing tactic as the source of its funding. The irony is likely lost on no one, as is the potential comedy stemming from the outspoken, anti-capitulating Spurlock sarcastically entering the corporate world and denigrating its steely, opportunistic rigidity. But, as Noam Chomsky points out, once you dip your toe into the machinations of a moneymaking status quo, the compromises and moral amendments merely compound from even the slightest compromise. While The Greatest Movie Ever Sold occasionally hits on some sharp observations on a culture of desire, showing kids being marketed to in schools and briefly mentioning the psychological repercussions of introducing children to advertising, it's mostly mired in Spurlock's ego and brand analysis, focusing on his increasing personal moral ambiguity. Beyond the genuinely funny moments of inter-film product placement – with Spurlock regularly drinking POM and meeting with academics at fast-food gas emporium Sheetz – there isn't a great deal of substance other than ideas. Seemingly, this comes from the knowledge that a populous demographic is far more interested in seeing the filmmaker laugh about Mane & Tail (a shampoo for humans and horses) or film a slightly subversive commercial for a hotel chain than learning about how resigned they are to defining themselves by material goods. It's unfortunate, since some of the interview subjects involved actually have some sharp insights about product placement and advertisements, which are often overshadowed by a gag about having to promote JetBlue or eat an Amy's pizza. The Blu-Ray features a commentary track and a "behind the scenes," which discusses more so the obligations to different companies and the nature of filming commercials versus a documentary, rarely touching upon any possible amendments made for sponsors. In addition, exclusively on Blu-Ray, there are some deleted scenes, some footage from Sundance and some background on Hyatt and JetBlue. (Sony)