A Perfect Getaway David Twohy

A Perfect Getaway David Twohy
Seasoned screenwriter and ambitious, although hit-and-miss genre director, David Twohy delivers a surprisingly compelling and entertaining thriller with A Perfect Getaway. A couple on a Hawaiian vacation (Steve Zahn and Milla Jovovich) meet another couple (Chris Hemsworth, looking very Thor-ready in his shirtlessness, and Mary Shelton) hitchhiking and after an amicable, but tense, exchange, the hitchers refuse a ride. Cliff and Sydney (Zahn and Jovovich, both in top form) continue along to their camping trail destination. On the path, they meet the charismatic, possibly eccentric Nick (Deadwood's Timothy Olyphant), who has one almost unbelievable tale after another to tell of his crazy adventures as what he jokingly calls an "American Jedi." Nick guides the couple to his partner Gina (Kiele Sanchez, holding up well surrounded by superior actors) and despite any misgivings about Nick's mental health, the couples decide to formally hit the trail together. Shortly after, word begins to spread from other hikers on the trail that vacationing couples were recently found murdered in the area. Suspicions abound and Twohy's oh-so-clever screenplay taunts the audience with references to storytelling devices, as Nick banters endlessly with Cliff about screenwriting. The winking at genre expectations would be too much were it not specifically appropriate to the interaction between the two men. Almost the entire script can be read in multiple ways, and coupled with superb acting from the pivotal roles, A Perfect Getaway is almost a perfect gift for audiences who love to hunt for clues. It's a shame then, after a brilliant and sensible twist, Twohy feels the need to over explain, bloating what could have been a viciously tight final act. There's plenty of satisfaction, largely thanks to the electric awesomeness of Timothy Olyphant, but handholding flashbacks mute the film's overall impact. The original ending is the only special feature included, and while the minor changes from it are important to the emotional resolution of the film, this is the kind of thoughtful movie making that deserves more thorough examination. (Alliance)