Partition Vic Sarin

Partition Vic Sarin
Telling a tragic tale inspired by events that actually happened to a friend of his father, writer/director/cinematographer Vic Sarin invests Partition with familial love. Set in India during the partition between Muslims and Sikhs in 1947, the story is reminiscent of Romeo and Juliet in its depiction of love forbidden by violent outside circumstances. An Indian solider (Jimi Ministry) who has come home in search of peace after facing the tragedies of war is thrust further into violent intolerance when he shelters a young Muslim woman (Kristen Kreuk). Love blooms and lessons of tolerance are learned but as must happen in a tragedy, all is given the opportunity to go awry, in this case through the blinding religious hatred of family members unwilling to see that the solution to death is life. Mistry gives his all as Gian, relaying haunting remorse and unbending passion in the steely glow of his eyes, and it’s his performance that anchors the film. Kristen Kreuk is surprisingly effective in her transformation into a young Pakistani woman, adopting the accent and mannerisms convincingly. The costumes look very authentic and the BC filming locations are almost shocking in their suitability as India in the ’40s, resembling the less populated landscape more easily than the actual locations in India could currently, according to Vic Sarin’s commentary. The other special feature, a "making of,” reveals that creating this film was very close to Sarin’s heart and that passion seems to have been passed on to his actors and crew. All of these passionate sentiments add to the emotional power of the story but it’s impossible to hide the weaknesses in the writing and directing. The script lacks nuance and Sarin has been unable to shake the television pedigree of his visual style. Still, Partition is a movie respectable for its intentions and will be emotionally wrenching for viewers not bothered by nagging clichés and a sheen of TV melodrama. (Seville)