Open Season 2 Matthew O'Callaghan and Todd Wilderman

Open Season 2 Matthew O'Callaghan and Todd Wilderman
Strangely covering the morality involved in the decision to conform to social expectations or live an anarchic life free of conformity, Open Season 2 offers up more laughs than usual for a straight-to-DVD sequel and points out that limitations are necessary in order to get what one wants, or at least what one is conditioned to want. Subtle implications that the moral majority typically find difference threatening, acting out in aggressive and violent ways when presented with it, likely won't mean much to the many seven-year olds watching the film, nor their parents, who are unlikely to assess the subtext in a movie about a runaway daschund. Aside from the use of rabbits as projectiles, a mentally handicapped cat and Roberto's (Steve Schirripa) preoccupation with defecation, there is little to object to in this mostly affable, easily digestible animated diversion. The vocal talents are solid, making up for some of the limitations in animation, and the name "Mr. Weenie" only alludes to an inappropriate euphemism once. Following the first Open Season film, the sequel starts with Elliot's (Joel McHale) marriage to Giselle (Jane Krakowski). Unfortunately, the impending union is put on the backburner when some oppressive humans kidnap Mr. Weenie (Cody Cameron). As Elliot, Giselle, Boog (Mike Epps) and crew try to rescue Mr. Weenie, a gang of domesticated pets, led by vigilant toy poodle Fifi (Crispin Glover), attempt to convert the impressionable daschund to their way of life. Included on the DVD are a variety of special features, including some deleted (and incomplete) scenes, as well as a "behind the scenes" featurette with interviews from some of the vocal talent. In addition, a "Who Let The Dogs Out" music video is unfortunately present, as is a more interesting, 20-minute "draw your favourite character" instruction guide for children. Also included are five remote accessible arcade games, which are better than average for children's DVD fare, and some DVD-Rom features. (Sony)