One Day [Blu-Ray] Lone Scherfig

One Day [Blu-Ray] Lone Scherfig
In simplified terms, the title of One Day refers to the premise, wherein a 20-year love story is viewed on July 15 every year, giving just a glimpse of development with rapid, albeit narratively fluent, progression. It's a clever premise that actually amplifies the greater themes of the story, which tackle the reality that one day can change absolutely everything, so it's best not to waste time or repress desires that might pass you by. To clarify, the repression of desires is what propels this romance forward, giving it the necessary dramatic tension to sustain a feature-length film, following the mousy, bookish Em (Anne Hathaway) and the cocksure, smug Dexter (Jim Sturgess) after a drunken, near-coital cottage graduation celebration. As the years pass, his promiscuous playboy tendencies and her slightly defensive and sarcastic disposition keep them at arm's reach from each other, afraid to express the depth of their feelings, lest they be rejected or ruin their friendship. What's smart about this adaptation of the titular David Nicholls novel is that it understands the logical development of people from their idealistic 20s to their pragmatic 40s. Em desperately wants to write a novel, but instead winds up settling for brainless jobs and lacklustre romances, assuming her dreams will come later. The problem is that later comes far more quickly than anyone expects, leading her to get a teaching degree rather than fulfil her ambitions. Contrarily, Dexter's "live in the moment" attitude pays off temporarily, landing him a television host gig, but eventually catches up with him when the constant performance wears on those around him, leaving him alone when he needs others the most. How these two grow apart and together is exceedingly identifiable, adding a dimension of genuine investment and heartache as they tenuously gravitate towards connection. Director Lone Scherfig doesn't muck it up with mawkish sappiness either, making the tender moments come from character development and performance rather than clichéd tropes and elevated musical scores. If there is a flaw, it's that the central narrative conceit leaves the young lovers constantly doling out exposition on July 15th to catch us up on the happenings throughout the year, which isn't particularly logical or fluid. Fortunately, these awkward moments are brief and barely detract from a story that's both intelligent and moving. Included with the Blu-Ray are a series of exceedingly brief snippets about character and style that are mostly filled with scenes from the movie. (Alliance)