Night of the Living Dorks Mathias Dinter

Night of the Living Dorks Mathias Dinter
German horror comedy Night Of The Living Dorks deserves the almost instant underground acclaim it has attained within the few short years since its original release (in 2004, to be exact). With an innovative plot, terrific tongue-in-cheek humour and some of the most ludicrous overdubbing this side of a martial arts flick, it is instantly endearing, amusingly timeless and decidedly dumb. Structurally, Night Of The Living Dorks is a bit convoluted. Philip, Wurst and Konrad are the epitome of high school losers. Routinely subjected to torment from the "cool” kids, these veritable outcasts run the gamut from pot-smoking stoner to horn-rim spectacle-clad nerd and plain old nobody. While secretly watching classmates bastardise an ancient voodoo ritual, the trio are accidentally struck by the blowing ashes of a Haitian corpse. Infected with the magical dust, they flee the scene, their van hits a tree and all are killed. It’s here the voodoo process takes over. Philip, Wurst and Konrad transform into the undead with no one the wiser. Unsure of how to react, they enlist the aid of next-door neighbour Rebecca while struggling to conceal what happened. This isn’t exactly easy, as they realise that zombies are much stronger than the living and have an insatiable taste for flesh. Cue a frenzy of close calls, cannibalism, sexual innuendo, Rebecca’s discovery of an antidote and a happy ending. Impressively, director Mathias Dinter does an incredible job of turning ridiculousness into an entertaining affair thanks to subtle twists on the ages-old zombie genre: maintaining a human element to his main characters and updating the structure for a more day-to-day atmosphere while still retaining elements crucial to tales of this nature. This results in an instant familiarity with Night Of The Living Dorks yet it still keeps viewers guessing. Factor in a few truly creative killings, kitsch and gory comedy and Night Of The Living Dorks is far more convincing and entertaining than its asinine title would prophesise. Extras include deleted/extended scenes and a "behind the scenes” featurette. (Anchor Bay)