Mr. Bean's Holiday Steve Bendelack

Mr. Bean's Holiday Steve Bendelack
The world last saw Mr. Bean (Rowan Atkinson) in the uninspired 1997 film Bean. He’s back and much funnier in his second big screen outing, Mr. Bean’s Holiday. Thankfully, after a decade-long break from the quirky, nearly silent character, Atkinson's performance is fresh and hilarious.

After winning a trip to Cannes, France, Mr. Bean heads south, causing mayhem and confusion for everyone he meets. While boarding a train, Bean accidentally separates a young boy (Max Baldry) from his father (Karel Roden) and takes the unaccompanied minor under his bumbling protection until he can reunite the family. The two find no end to their troubles as they make their way through the French countryside, eventually hitching a ride with Sabine (Emma de Caunes), an up and coming actress on her way to the Cannes Film Festival.

Atkinson said that this will be the last time he plays Mr. Bean, which is sad because this film is a reminder of why the character is so beloved the world over. Atkinson is truly a master of physical comedy, captivating the audience for 90 minutes with barely a word spoken. The 11-year-old Baldry is impressive as well, managing to match wits with Atkinson’s comedic genius throughout most of the film. And Willem Dafoe co-stars as an egocentric film director who is repeatedly plagued by Bean’s antics.

Mr. Bean’s Holiday, while not as funny as some of the classic television episodes, is a worthy curtain call for the Mr. Bean character. This film is well worth a watch for fans of Mr. Bean’s rubber faced antics, even if he does go on vacation with no mention of his beloved stuffed bear Teddy. (Universal)