Moon [Blu-Ray] Duncan Jones

Moon [Blu-Ray] Duncan Jones
It's been a banner year for science fiction, and even among a crop that's more cream than crap, Moon stands out as a unique entity. With a script written specifically for him, Sam Rockwell digs into his role as Sam Bell like a reverse-suction tick, pumping vitality into every scene. A mining technician nearing the end of a three-year contract in a base on the dark side of the moon, Sam's only company is an A.I. computer named GERTY (voiced with appropriate dispassion by Kevin Spacey) and the occasional pre-recorded video message from his wife and daughter back home. Giant harvesting machines process moon rock and cook it to release Helium Three gas. It's Sam's job to collect canisters of the gas from the harvesters and ship them back to Earth. Already feeling the psychological strain of his isolation, Sam begins to question his sanity after an accident with a harvester results in his being pseudo-quarantined to the base. To know any more of the plot would be a disservice to the cleverly unfolding story Moon tells. First-time feature director Duncan Jones knows sci-fi and how to manipulate the expectations of audiences savvy to genre hallmarks and tropes. Nods and winks to classics like 2001, Alien and Silent Running abound, but in terms of tone and pacing, Moon feels more akin to Soderbergh's Solaris, thanks in part to a wonderfully moody score by Clint Mansell. Any comparisons are somewhat feeble though ― through his unabashed homage shines a distinct filmmaker's voice. Jones's passion and talent are illuminated in a spectacular batch of special features. Extensively detailed "Making Of" and "VFX" features demonstrate the hard work and ingenuity employed to make such a beautiful sci-fi film for just five-million bucks, however low-key its action. Fans of genre classics will relish the attention spent on '70s-style model work for the gorgeous exterior moon shots. Two separate Q&A sessions with Jones are included, along with two separate commentary tracks, all of which are informative, entertaining and depict a confident and charming artist in love with his craft. As a real bonus, Jones's only other film work outside of commercials is included, a short called Whistle. It's a very BBC-looking production that examines fatherhood through a tale of a family man who makes ends meet as a remote satellite assassin. Moon is cinematic gold for fans more concerned with the moral implications of technology science fiction can explore than eyeball-melting explosions, and Jones has marked himself as a director to watch right out of the gate. (Sony)