Mimesis Douglas Schulze

Mimesis Douglas Schulze
2
What do you get when a creatively bankrupt hack thinks he has an original idea? A clumsy piece of barely competent filmmaking that tries so hard to pat itself on the back for having a "message" that it ends up resembling the movie equivalent of a dog chasing its tail. Mimesis is positioned as both an ode to horror fans and a damnation of any party who uses "art" as a scapegoat for reprehensible human behaviour. It's a topic worth discussing, but the manner in which director Douglas Schulze and writing partner Joshua Wagner approach the conversation is so clunky and juvenile that any considerations of moral culpability are bulldozed by amateurish acting and a script with all the nuances of a PTA meeting in the '90s about who to blame for kids searching the sewers for Ninja Turtles. Here's the setup: a selection of convention-goers are invited to an exclusive after-party that turns out to be a sick round of forced role-playing for a bunch of horror-obsessed psychopaths. Lured by a couple of cute goths, the invitees are drugged and dressed-up as characters from Night of the Living Dead. Viewers and participants slow to put the glaring hints together have it spelled out for them by the resident horror buff and the obvious tell of the Romero classic itself playing on a television inside the farm house the group of one-dimensional ciphers are trapped in. Early on, Schulze tries to engineer the situation to feel like something supernatural might be going on, and due to large unintentional lapses in realism, it almost works, albeit in a way that would signify an exceptionally inconsistent take on undead mythology. His Hostel-biting intentions are pretty transparent, though taking it a step further into voyeurism-isn't-enough territory could be an effective conceit in more capable hands. As it stands, betrayed by acts of random stylization and pathetic special effects — CGI blood has never looked worse — Mimesis isn't a case of life imitating art, it's a case of an imitation imitating schlock. The best part of this Blu-Ray release is that it doesn't include any special features to occupy anymore of anyone's time. (Anchor Bay)