The Mighty Boosh 3

The Mighty Boosh 3
There's no denying that The Mighty Boosh is one of the strangest comedies on television. It's a surreal stream-of-consciousness strapped to a more conventional sitcom, yet for some peculiar reason it works. It might take a few viewings before it all clicks but when it finally does it is a spectacularly funny show. Written by and starring Julian Barratt and Noel Fielding, it features a bizarre cast of characters, including jazz fan Howard Moon (Barratt), androgynous glam rocker Vince Noir (Fielding), freelance shaman Naboo the Enigma (played by Fielding's brother Michael) and Bollo, a giant talking ape. The many other recurring and new characters, several played by Barratt and Fielding, are even weirder, helping to create a peculiar world where their surreal adventures happen. The third series finds The Mighty Boosh at the height of its popularity in the UK, with the live stage version selling-out arenas and theatres. While the main characters are the same, the setting has changed once again. Gone are the zoo and the apartment from previous series, and the action now takes place in a shop owned by Naboo ("The Nabootique"), where Howard and Vince work. Or at least some of the action, because they also end up at the Velvet Onion club and even inside Vince in a rather silly tribute to sci-fi classic Fantastic Voyage. Despite the fact that there are only six episodes, the quality is all over the place, with some of the duo's best work and some skits that fall a little flat. The problem is that at this point, they should know better but sometimes the writing is just lazy, relying on weirdness for a quick laugh. Yet episodes like "The Power of the Crimp," where Howard and Vince are challenged by a pair of doppelgangers, are downright hilarious from beginning to end. And even the weaker shows have their funny moments. The Mighty Boosh 3 won't win over cynics and it isn't the best place for newcomers to start but there's absolutely no doubt that Barratt and Fielding know how to preach to the converted. Fans will love it and the more adventurous will find plenty of evidence of why it's so beloved. It's an acquired taste, for sure, but one well worth attaining. As with pretty much every DVD out there, the ubiquitous commentary tracks are here, with the cast joking around and having more fun than those who have to listen to them. The best of the extras are a couple of 30-minute featurettes, one on making the third season and the other on the cast's publicity tour to promote it, both featuring some interesting behind-the-scenes, candid moments. The outtakes and deleted scenes aren't quite as essential but still provide a few smiles. (Warner)