Metalocalypse Season One

Metalocalypse Season One

The Metalocalypse most certainly has begun. Although this cartoon about a collection of brain-dead death metallers dubbed Deathklok jests that they are so popular they’ve become the 12th largest economy on the planet, such a gag may not be too far off in the future. With the hilarious antics and amazing soundtrack produced by Adult Swim, Metalocalypse is not only incredibly engaging but is deservedly popular. Throughout this first season of 20 11-minute episodes, we follow the likes of singer Nathan Explosion, guitarists Toki Wartooth and Skwisgaar Skwigelf, bassist William Murderface and Pickles the drummer as they not only perform outrageous death metal that would startle the likes of Cannibal Corpse but deal with the undying adoration of the world, their own stupidity and devotion to all things metal. From creating the heaviest of coffee jingles to awakening a sleeping Finnish troll that decimates a city and unveiling Pickles’ former cock-rock career, the band seem to stumble their way through life Beavis and Butthead-style. Only these idiots are making the music, not judging it from the armchair. Despite the incredibly genre-specific outline, Metalocalypse most certainly appeals to all demographics. Those lacking even a nodding acquaintance with heavy metal of any classification would find the dubious schemes and ridiculous outcomes of Dethklock quite amusing. The simpleton aspect of each character and their various idiosyncrasies are instantly likeable and the inside jokes for true metal fanatics become an engaging bout of "I Spy” for the keen. Moments such as an onslaught of album and song titles thrown into the script, guest appearances from metal icons (not as themselves, mind you) or stores named after various black metal bands feel like a subtle wink from the creators to fans, in a "We’re all in this together” kind of way. While bonus Easter Egg "Murder Features,” including band interviews, a tour of the band’s cavernous home and Murder Reel, are little more than afterthoughts, they do enhance the already comical episodes. (Adult Swim/ Warner)