Look Adam Rifkin

Look Adam Rifkin
Does it take a voyeur to know a voyeur, or does it take an exhibitionist to know a voyeur? Whatever convoluted combination may be the case, Adam Rifkin has made a film about it. The director most notable for sex, drugs and KISS guilty-pleasure teen comedy Detroit Rock City makes an attempt to play Big Brother via the premise of edited together security camera footage. It's a ripe excuse for gratuitous nudity and although attention grabbing, loading the first scene with two nearly naked, supposedly teenage girls makes the film difficult to take seriously from the get-go. At least that's as blatant as Look gets in the creepy, director-as-peeping-tom sort of way. Cobbling together footage of varying quality from a number of locations, complete with time stamps and helpful identifiers in most cases, narratives start to emerge. A department store stock manager man-sluts it up with the female staff; a happily married lawyer secretly meets with his gay lover; a teenage girl tries to seduce her English teacher; a gas station clerk is a struggling musician with girlfriend problems; an ambiguous African man with a backpack on a bus is mistaken for Middle Eastern; an insurance sales geek is tormented by his co-workers; and two killers go on a mini-rampage. Some of the stories tie together directly, while other connections are limited to a drive-by or walkthrough. It's a stretch and Rifkin is hell-bent on leaving the viewer with an unsettling neutral look at a series of horrific moral acts. Look has an ending so dark Todd Solondz wouldn't even find it funny. That controversially, family-unfriendly twist climax is discussed in a typical director/producers commentary. There's a Ron Jeremy cameo among the many deleted and alternate scenes, which is pretty kind of him, after Rifkin tells the creepy legend he "needed a bloated corpse, and we don't have the budget for make-up" during a conversation in the surprisingly honest and transparent "Behind the Scenes." (Anchor Bay)