Little Fockers Paul Weitz

Little Fockers Paul Weitz
In the April Fool's episode of the first season of Community, Britta decides to play a practical joke on her teacher by putting a frog wearing a sombrero on his desk. Noting the broad obviousness and grade school simplicity of the plan, Jeff says to Britta, "Yeah, that's something that you would find funny," putting emphasis on the word "you." Now, later in the episode, when Britta attempts to steal a frog from the science lab, she accidentally knocks a cadaver out of a window into the quad and then steps on the frog, which actually is quite funny. What I'm getting at here is that Little Fockers is very much like a frog in a sombrero on Senor Chang's desk; it's so familiar, broad and lame that only the least humorous people on the planet could have any appreciation for it. One of the biggest gags in the film is also the main plot point, wherein Jack Byrnes (Robert De Niro), conscious of his own mortality after a minor heart attack, asks his son-in-law, Gaylord Focker (Ben Stiller), to be the familial "Godfocker." From what I understand, the use of the neologism "Godfocker" is supposed to be quite funny on its own, and not because it implies sodomizing the mythical creator of man. Outside of this and an abundance of awkwardly interjected cameos from Barbra Streisand, Harvey Keitel and Dustin Hoffman, the film is essentially about De Niro following Stiller around under the assumption he's having an affair with a plucky young pharmaceutical rep hilariously named Andi Garcia (Jessica Alba); you know, like Andy Garcia, only female. Craziness! To be fair, there is a single scene where Laura Dern mistakes De Niro and Stiller for a homosexual couple that's mildly amusing, along with a scene where a young child asks, "Can women poop from their vaginas?" at the dinner table. The pooping vagina thing isn't all that funny, but the presence of Blythe Danner – someone that doesn't strike me as having much of a funny bone for somewhat misogynist, scatological humour – while such a subject is being discussed, is. Along with an alternate opening and ending, the DVD includes the usual promotional "making of" associated with studio movies, along with a gag reel and mini-supplements on the fight scene and so on. Quite frankly, it would probably be better to just skip this film altogether and re-watch the first season of Community. (Universal)