Lewis Black: In God We Rust

Lewis Black: In God We Rust
In the comedy spectrum, Lewis Black occupies a space somewhere between the angry rants of Denis Leary and the shrill screams of Sam Kinison. In his newest special, he brings the same amusing vitriol that catapulted him to prominence as a regular correspondent on The Daily Show With Jon Stewart to a number of topics. Politics, as always, earn a share of Black's ire, as he takes non-partisan aim at such issues as homeland security and abortion. Taping at the State Theatre in Minneapolis, he doesn't miss the opportunity to get in a few choice jabs at the expense of Michelle Bachmann and the Tea Party. For the most part though, the comedian is more interested this time around in issues pertaining to technology, devoting a large chunk of time (perhaps a little too much) to the concept of cell phones, dissecting the iPhone and Android. It's to be expected, but Black is clearly not enamoured with Facebook, commenting on what would have to be considered low-hanging fruit at this point by pointing out the inanity of Farmville. On the other hand, he has little issue with body scanners at airports, finding more humour in those that object to the idea and suggesting that he would arrive to the airport naked should it save him substantial time in line. Black's abrasive delivery has always been somewhat of an acquired taste and he isn't likely to win any new fans with this set. Those that find some small catharsis in relating to his disdain for many of the same things that grate on everyone's nerves are sure to derive some pleasure from the nearly 90-minute routine. That said, even devotees would admit that this isn't his strongest material, with only a handful of quotable lines and bits. Stand-up DVDs rarely offer much in the way of bonus material and this one is no exception, but there are a couple of deleted segments that offer a glimpse into the audience's role in the performance. Mere minutes after discussing how his shows often inspire walk-outs, a couple are only too pleased to illustrate the comic's point, with a departing man responding to the goading Black by giving the finger without so much as turning around or breaking stride. More fuel for the fire, it would appear. (Comedy Central)