Lemmy [Blu-Ray] Greg Olliver and Wes Orshoski

Lemmy [Blu-Ray] Greg Olliver and Wes Orshoski
Over the course of almost 40 years, guttuarl rockers Motörhead have been largely consistent. Still, with a few inevitable missteps, they've proven that sometimes the whole is more valuable than its parts. This is especially true when considering the vastness of their influence throughout the strains of rock, punk, metal and its various sub-categories ― a few bum albums can be overlooked. When fronted by such an enigmatic character as Ian "Lemmy" Kilmister though, the line between band and man quickly blur: Lemmy makes Motörhead just as much as Motörhead is Lemmy. Looking to strip away some of the mystique surrounding one of rock's largest icons, Lemmy follows the modern cowboy through his daily life ― hanging at the bar gambling, smoking, indulging in his war hobby ― while alternately being heralded as a definitive force in music. Bolstered by interviews with various other stars (Joan Jett, Slash, Alice Cooper) and a touch of personal history, we're treated to a passable documentary for both unwitting and diehard Motörfans. Still, Olliver and Orshoski are unable to shake their "in the presence of greatness" mentality, foregoing digging up serious meat. Instead, they favour a big game of follow-the-star from dressing room to stage, apartment to regular haunt, interspersing the journey with a few sage comments. While Lemmy is modestly insightful, although just shy of filling, content-wise, seeing Kilmister hit the stage and blast through his day job in the clarity of Blu-Ray, one almost has the feeling of better-than-the-real thing. Quality image definition and sharp sound give a closer, more defined seat than if we were poised on the man's amp. Moreover, a glance at the bonus material is enough to make the toughest rockers squeal like schoolgirls. Jam-packed with extra features and titbits ― something like 200 hours ― Lemmy on Blu-Ray is a goldmine of collectibles, information, rockin' out and backstage fun. Unlike most discs, these extras feature compelling content and value. From complete interviews only touched upon during the film to expanded casual conversations with Dave Grohl and Billy Bob Thornton, live footage of the band/Lemmy with Metallica and, more importantly, examinations of those sentimental, dedicated, honourable and respectful sides of the man only hinted at during the feature, one gains a better understanding of the documentary's subject via these add-ons than through the film proper. And that's without touching upon the road crew extras, "making of" featurette, outtakes with Kilmister and wrestler Triple H ― it goes on and on. Essentially, this is where the true point, relevance and meaning of aligning Motörhead's "big picture" legacy with Lemmy's Blu-Ray version takes hold. While Lemmy might not be entirely rewarding on its own, when coupled with a veritable onslaught of extras that are arguably more important than the cover-all-bases aspect of the film, we are treated to the true Motörhead experience. The Lemmy Blu-ray is a sum exponentially greater than its parts. (Mongrel Media)