Just Go With It [Blu-Ray] Dennis Dugan

Just Go With It [Blu-Ray] Dennis Dugan
If you can gauge the success of a comedy on the number of times the main character gets hit in the testicles with sundry objects, then Just Go With It is surely one of the greatest comedies of the year, featuring three different scenes wherein characters are whacked in the sack with a stick, a fist and the head of a fat child. It's good to know that the old America's Funniest Home Videos staples are still alive and well in the world of mainstream comedy, ensuring that testicular damage and possible sterility generate laughs and delight amongst the Two and a Half Men crowd. But, to be fair, the plight of the injured nads isn't even the most strained gag in Adam Sandler's latest high concept comedy, where he pretends to be married to his assistant, Katherine (Jennifer Aniston), in order to win the affections of busty blonde Palmer (Brooklyn Decker). There's also a scene where best friend Eddie (Nick Swardson) molests and beats a sick sheep after his bluff of being a sheep transporter comes full circle at a sketchy Hawaiian restaurant. That's right, in addition to slow motion scenes of comely lasses in bikinis, ball punching and a highly implausible scenario built for comic shenanigans there is borderline bestial interference with animals. And what's more is that the "aw, shucks" charm of Sandler has been replaced with bland indifference and wicked cynicism, as his character is essentially a deplorable, predatory dick that the perpetually damaged Aniston fawns over knowing mainly that this might be as good as it gets in a disappointing life. Sure, there are mildly surreal moments worth seeing, such as Dave Matthews picking up a coconut with his ass and shoving it in Nicole Kidman's face, and Aniston is as good as ever at delivering slightly patronizing one-liners with distracted amusement, but there's nothing here that we haven't seen before with far more enthusiasm and wit. Included with the Blu-Ray are a ridiculous number of supplements, including commentary tracks with Sandler and director Dennis Dugan, along with a gag reel and an abundance of features on various actors and on-set gags that essentially add up to one long, desultory "making of." Fortunately, there are two separate mini-supplements on Kevin Nealon's makeup in the film, which is vital, seeing as he's only in one scene. (Sony)