Jellyfish Shira Geffen and Etgar Keret

Jellyfish Shira Geffen and Etgar Keret
Delving into the inherent disconnect between loved ones, which stems from both an inability to communicate and a preoccupation with one’s plights and subjectivity from past, present and future, Jellyfish paints an occasionally surreal portrait of intersecting lives that find clarity and perspective in unlikely places. Everything about the film is appealing, from the shot compositions to performances to collective ideological depth, despite the fact that a couple of the storylines find unearned catharsis in improperly developed relationships. The insight that constant dwelling on the negative things in life causes us to miss the glaringly obvious and ignore those in need is well presented and certainly worthy of cinematic treatment. While the message is evident in all three storylines, it is at its clearest in the story of Keren (Noa Knoller) and Michael (Gera Sandler), a newly married couple who spend their honeymoon finding fault in everything around them, ultimately ignoring the despondency of a woman whom they exploit. Additionally, the after-effects of how neglect and indifference on a child can affect adult trust and confidence issues are explored in a plotline involving a young woman named Batia (Sarah Adler). The third storyline examines the irony of Joy (Ma-Nenita De Latorre) leaving her son in the Philippines to take care of elderly clients in Israel, who themselves act only as an inconveniences to their children. They are all brought together by the metaphor of the jellyfish, which represents the refuge and seeming endlessness of the sea in a world where destiny seems out of control. Included on the DVD is a 20-minute interview with directors Geffen and Keret, which wisely examines the nature of subjectivity, mise-en-scène and the conscious lack of distinction between reality and fantasy in their film. While it makes a great addition to the DVD, their English is often hard to follow. (Maximum)