Jeff, Who Lives At Home [Blu-Ray] Jay and Mark Duplass

Jeff, Who Lives At Home [Blu-Ray] Jay and Mark Duplass
How dependent on weed-enforced delusions does one have to be in order to become obsessed with finding profound meaning in M. Night Shyamalan's idiotic, water-phobic alien invasion movie, Signs? However lost to reason and responsibility titular slacker Jeff (Jason Segel, The Muppets) is, apparently. Thirty, unemployed and still living in his mother's basement, Jeff is so preoccupied with distracting himself from his pathetic situation that he looks everywhere except at himself for a sign to tell him what to do with his life. A random wrong number provides the perfect opportunity for Jeff to go off mission from his mother's simple request to buy some glue to fix a closet door. He becomes fixated on following anything with the name Kevin on it, which, after reinforcing some racial stereotypes, leads the lumbering man-child to his insecure jerk of a brother, Pat (Ed Helms, demonstrating more emotional believability than he's ever had the chance to in The Office or those dreadful, derivative Hangover movies), who's just had a major spat with his wife over being a self-absorbed, irresponsible ass-hat. The usually wacky Judy Greer (Arrested Development) gets a chance to play it straight as Pat's wife, Linda, who's courting the idea of infidelity after her husband's underhanded Porsche purchase, and her and Helms make a convincing couple suffering from romantic atrophy. Less slickly integrated into the happenstance versus destiny plot mechanisms is Susan Sarandon's role as the brothers' mother, titillated by the attention showered upon her by a secret admirer at work. It's a warm depiction of the value of untraditional companionship, but it feels underdeveloped and only tangentially connected to Jeff's meandering journey. The Duplass brothers are creeping closer to making a mainstream dramedy, but their honesty and languid peculiarities still shine through an increasingly professional sheen. Special feature-free, Jeff isn't as outright funny or as moving as Cyrus, but it possesses enough idiosyncrasies to make it a heartfelt diversion. (Paramount)