Jackass 3-D Jeff Tremaine

Jackass 3-D Jeff Tremaine
Well, folks, it's been a few years and none of the major cast members have died, so it's time for another round of Jackass. The formula hasn't changed; it's still the same gang of idiots injuring each other in elaborately stupid ways. If you hated it before, this new offering won't convert you. Admittedly, things feel a little more jovial with the Jackass crew this time around. Sure, they're still doing things like punching each other in face when no one is looking, but nothing feels quite as malicious as Jackass 2. At this point, everyone is just having a blast and genuinely wants to be there. There's a nice nostalgic vibe of hanging out with old friends that defines the film and played a role in making it easily the most successful entry in the series. Well, that and the 3D glasses, of course. But I'm probably getting a little bit too thoughtful. Let's face facts: this is a movie about morons beating the shit out of each other and tackling absurdly dangerous stunts, and it's just as fun to watch as it sounds. For whatever reason, it's hilarious to see grown men play tetherball with a beehive, kick a midget in the groin and try to pin a tail on a real donkey. If anything, the fact that these guys are older makes it all a little funnier. They've also started paying homage to the cartoons and slapstick comedians of the past, gleefully acknowledging their forbearers. Jackass appeals to a base form of comedy that isn't going away. Man fall down equals funny and that isn't ever going to change. Being John Malkovich director Spike Jonze once again adds a little extra flavour to the proceedings. He appears on camera as a fat old lady and also designed the surreally glossy opening and ending scenes, as well as a few performance art stunts, like an all-midget barroom brawl that has to be seen to be believed. But, the movie does belong to the motley crew of Jackass idiots and they all come out to play, including Steve-O, whose recent sobriety might mean he's aware of how needlessly dangerous his stunts are, but that certainly doesn't stop him ― you just can't keep that kind of stupidity down. The Blu-Ray release offers a pretty, hi-def transfer, a funny making-of feature, plus about 50 minutes of outtakes and deleted scenes (nothing major though, as a lot of deleted material is being saved for the inevitable Jackass 3.5). A DVD with old school red/blue 3D glasses is included, but really only benefits a few gimmicky gags. Oddly enough, watching idiots be idiots works just as well in 2D. Who'd have thought? (Paramount)