Interview Steve Buscemi

Interview Steve Buscemi
Dutch director Theo van Gogh was senselessly murdered before he could remake his film Interview in NYC. Thus it has been entrusted to Steve Buscemi to do the honours, though the final product doesn’t exactly have me panting to see the original.

Buscemi plays Pierre Peders, a bitter, alcoholic political reporter who’s been reduced to interviewing celebrities he feels are beneath his journalistic talents. So it follows that he’s assigned to gab with TV star Katya (Sienna Miller), about whom he knows nothing and whom he proceeds to pelt with contempt and abuse. She wisely terminates the interview — the last realistic behaviour in the movie. However, tortuous plot developments contrive to reposition the pair in her spacious loft, where they bond, swap saliva and reveal their deepest, darkest secrets in the most unlikely manner possible.

Buscemi’s character is loathsome and belligerent throughout, and any sensible hostess would have kicked him to the curb within nanoseconds, but Miller indulges him so much that you just sit and yearn for her to knee him in the groin. The actress proves to be a far better performer than her celebutante rep would have you believe but she’s fighting a losing battle against a character circumscribed by cliché and implausibility. And the filmmakers seem to have no idea of what happens in the world of journalism, with Buscemi doing and enduring things that would never go down with a sensible editor watching.

Though the film tries for a turning of the tables with its would-be shock ending, 80 or so minutes of the male lead’s bile is still too much for any self-respecting audience to take. (Peace Arch)