InAlienable Robert Dyke

InAlienable Robert Dyke
When watching a movie like Inalienable, it's difficult not to think of the many well-made and heartfelt independent and foreign films that never find distribution, theatrical or ancillary, falling wayside while comprehensively inept manure like this finds its way to video stores around the country. Much like other similar recent DVD epics like Silent Venom and Warbirds, Inalienable takes itself seriously, to a certain degree, despite ill-fitting costumes, unfinished sets, improperly recorded sound and scene cutaways that suggest editing room apathy. Of course, who can blame the technical team for not caring when the plot follows Eric Norris (Battlestar Galactica's Richard Hatch), a research doctor injecting HIV into monkeys, or something, who develops a weird, moving body growth when exposed to a meteor rock. Since it came after banging his much younger, and seemingly desperate, assistant Amanda (Courtney Peldon), the question of illness comes into play, until they discover that it's actually an alien baby. Since Eric lost his son in an unintentionally amusing prelude, he develops feelings for the alien, tentacles and all, leading to a courtroom battle about maternal/paternal rights over parasitic aliens, which involves Star Trek's Marina Sirtis. It's hard to imagine anyone reading this script without raising their eyebrow occasionally and asking, "and you're sure this isn't porn?," given that almost every scene of dialogue involves overly long-winded, poorly worded exposition and awkward sarcasm. Scenes drag on for literally ten minutes while actors stand still, given nothing to do, reciting unlikely observations about the alien baby. Worse still are bizarre cutaways involving angry mobs during the embarrassing court battle, wherein extras smile blankly while rabble-rousing, seemingly for six hours straight. They would get tired, no? On the upside, the dramatic, slow-motion finale and initial father/alien bonding moment are pure comedy gold. No supplements are included with the DVD, which is unfortunate, as actor/director interviews would be priceless. (Anchor Bay)