Humanoids from the Deep Barbara Peters

Humanoids from the Deep Barbara Peters
Roger Corman may be an industry legend, but in his 50-plus years as a producer, he's made many shitty films. Humanoids From The Deep is one of them. Corman's ability to polish a turd into a golden cult classic is downright genius, but no matter how ridiculous this 1980 creature feature gets, it never earns that status. The plot deserves most of the blame. The histrionic narrator in the "making of" sums it up best: "Things go horribly wrong when a CanCo fish cannery experiment with trout growth hormone accidentally mutates into depraved, human-like creatures with a ravenous appetite to procreate with the village of Noyo's virile women." Sounds like a dumb good time, but while there's plenty of dumbness, Humanoids forgets the fun, even when it comes to the slapstick massacre at the carnival towards the finale (the monsters themselves bring a comedic element, though inadvertently). But the real mistake was made by Corman, as revealed in the "making of" featurette. Originally titled Beneath the Darkness, Peters felt she was making a film where the humanoids "kill the men and rape the women." Corman had another idea in mind. Once Peters finished with Beneath the Darkness, Corman hired a male director to shoot the monster rape scenes then spliced in the "gratuitous violence, sex and nudity" and renamed it Humanoids From The Deep. Peters and the cast members were upset over how the final version of the film turned out, especially the name change, which to them sounded like it wouldn't be taken seriously. To add insult to injury, Humanoids blatantly bites Jaws' underwater cinematography and incidental score. Film pundit Leonard Maltin somehow keeps a straight face in an interview with Corman, where he stresses the importance of bringing laughs into his horror flicks. Unfortunately for him, the only laugh that comes from this film is in the first few minutes when that ridiculous title credit hits the screen. (Shout! Factory)