How She Move Ian Iqbal Rashid

How She Move Ian Iqbal Rashid
It’s a shame that the theatrical release of this Canadian dance movie was overshadowed by the release of Step Up 2 The Streets, because it’s at least as good, if not way better. Eschewing the usual generic hip-hop dance styles for the slightly more innovative world of "step,” the story is typical dance drama: Raya, a smart and ambitious girl from a poor neighbourhood, has to give up her private school education when her family falls on hard times after the drug-related death of her older sister. When she returns to the old neighbourhood, she gets drawn back into the dance world she’d left behind. When a big competition provides her with an opportunity to win the money she’d need to continue her education, she joins an old friend’s crew and starts re-establishing some long lost relationships. Newcomer Rutina Wesley — she has no film acting credits but she’s a Julliard grad, and it shows — is charming as Raya, and the second female lead (Tre Armstrong) is pretty bang-on as the tough and sexy friend/rival Michelle. The best thing about How She Move is that the film never forgets it’s about dancing. No matter how emotional the drama gets, it doesn’t for a second overshadow the slick choreography and elaborate montages of rehearsals, competitions and performances. In a featurette that traces the dancing from rehearsal to film, the actors complain about long days of hard work trying to get all the moves down. It really shows in the film. Other special features spend entirely too much time rehashing the film’s plot through every actor’s unique vision, but the dance one is worth a look, even though it’s unfortunately a bit too much interview and a bit too little dance. The soundtrack, the costumes and especially the dancing are fantastic. Don’t rent this if you’re looking for a tearjerker about family relations. If you’re a fan of the dance genre though, it’s a must see. (Mongrel Media)