Hostel: Part II Eli Roth

Hostel: Part II Eli Roth

The critical analysis on why Eli Roth’s Hostel franchise is the personification of "torture porn” is a done-to-death topic, so let’s not go there. Instead, let’s discuss how his sequel is rather good and far superior to its predecessor. Using the previous instalment’s story arc to tie the two films together, Roth jumps ahead to a new batch of not-so-innocent American tourists who, surprise, surprise, end up at the same Slovakian hostel. Only treading the same path to show the industry behind the torture chambers, Roth throws in another perspective: the wealthy clientele who pay for the sadistic service. It’s an interesting parallel to watch while it lasts — the apprehension and excitement of the two American businessmen allow the viewer to relate to both sides, well, some viewers. But the droll nature, which far outweighs the original’s seriousness, snuffs out any urge to analyse its psychological weight, especially when you start laughing at the severed penis bit. Hostel Part II is what you think it is: a savage, sick satire that refuses any kind of earnest conclusion. Why can’t we just leave it at that? As far as the extras, Roth gets ambitious with three commentaries but, as expected, the must-hear is the one where friend/executive producer Quentin Tarantino shoots his mouth off about the Coppola children, the Thanksgiving trailer (shot on location during Hostel Part II) and how his kind of violence differs from Roth’s. The deleted scenes are presented with Roth’s explanatory notes, which, unfortunately, are the best part. "The Next Level” appears to cover the film’s sequel status, however it seems more fixated on the physique of associate producer Mark Bakunas. "Legacy of Torture,” on the other hand, tries to debunk the negative attention that attached itself to Hostel like a putrid stink. Roth himself does some explaining and stat dropping while using some favourable psychoanalysts and experts to back him up. Plus: radio interview. (Maple)