The Hills Have Eyes 2 Martin Weisz

The Hills Have Eyes 2 Martin Weisz
Few remakes can exist without embarrassing the original, let alone matching or, dare to dream, bettering it. But Alexandre Aja’s 2006 version of The Hills Have Eyes lived up to its potential, bleeding all over Wes Craven’s original with a much more ferocious vision. It only figures then that Aja was smart enough to steer clear of the sequel. The original 1985 sequel was nearly a parody of its predecessor, relying heavily on flashbacks and a ridiculous script that involved the mutant family feeding on a group of motor-cross kids. Who knew a second stab at making a sequel could tarnish the franchise even further. Without so much as touching on the original, the film begins on an army base located in the desert where the mutants now live in caves. In no time soldiers begin disappearing one by one and soon the remaining few are left to fight off the cannibalistic crew. There’s little plot to go by and both the acting and the writing borders on B level. Yes, the script is a particular low for this sort of torture porn and shockingly, Wes Craven actually co-wrote it with his son Jonathan in one month, and it certainly shows. To hear him speak so proudly in the featurettes is baffling, as this film has to rank at the top of his not so illustrious career (remember Cursed?). He sits down with film school graduates to discuss the fundamentals of the movie but anyone who’s seen the film would be hard-pressed to take his words as sincere. The surplus of extras is exhausting, leading me to believe that this DVD is being sold on the quantity not the quality it offers. However, the alternate ending is actually creepier than the theatrical version but that’s where anything remotely worthwhile ends. Deleted scenes offer little; a look at the graphic novel based on the film is spoken in geek talk; and "Mutants Attack” tries to paint the killers as key components of the storytelling, but that’s complete bullshit. This sequel actually pushes back the role of the killers and there’s hardly any character development at all, though the cast and crew try their best to have you believe that what they’ve made is some kind of accomplishment. Plus: trailer. (Fox)