Hank and Mike Matthiew Klinck

Hank and Mike Matthiew Klinck
There's an old punk rock song about how some of the world's best-laid plans still end up in the garbage bin. Such a kitschy outlook is pretty much the easiest explanation and sorest spot with sketchy feature-length comedy Hank And Mike. It's a great plan that ends up dangerously close to being an outright waste. Hank and Mike are Easter bunnies — not men dressed up as Easter bunnies. They're actual pink bunnies that work for the Easter Corporation, going around planting treats for children to find every year. One bunny loves and excels at his job. The other hates it with a passion. Unfortunately for both, at a time of inner-office politics and restructuring, the duo forget to visit one girl's house and are fired. They then must apply their limited abilities to a plethora of other jobs, with seemingly hilarious results. From school cafeteria workers to sanitation engineers and so on, Hank and Mike realize that they are lost without bunny-dom. Overall, while Hank and Mike (Thomas Michael and Paolo Mancini, respectively) are interesting enough characters performed by quite believable and formidable actors, it's the shoestring plot that fails to tie this flick together. Such a simple premise seems stretched beyond its means when expanded to a 90-minute film, and when the original creators (Michael, Mancini and Klinck all worked together on 2005's Greg & Gentillion) are forced to adhere to the confines of typical movies — predictable set-up, ensuing problem, break-down, solution and love interest — they seem trapped more than liberated. The end result is a film boasting an interesting idea, a few good gags and lots of forgettable filler. Credit, however, should go to the group for the onslaught of extras, such as Hank and Mike heckling the flick, a short film, Easter Eggs, deleted scenes, alternate takes and more. (E1)