Greg the Bunny

Greg the Bunny
Sometimes the world makes no sense. TV is a good example. It's mind-baffling to wonder how some shows can last forever, or even two seasons. Shows like Family Matters (a castrated geek does not make for good viewing), Train 48 (are we that stupid?) and just about anything on CBS over the last 15 years are all unforgivable successes, especially when quality programs like Undeclared, Freaks and Geeks and Greg the Bunny were never given a fair chance. For anyone unfamiliar with the latter, Greg the Bunny was a Fox sitcom that ran between 2001 and 2002 and only lasted 11 episodes before it was yanked. Why it was yanked is beyond anyone who tuned in weekly because it had everything going for it: a strong, funny cast (Eugene Levy, Seth Green, Sarah Silverman, Bob Gunton), great cameos (Gary Oldman, Corey Feldman, Marilu Henner) and a loveable cast of "Fabricated Americans" (don't call them "socks"). Part Meet the Feebles, part The Muppet Show, Greg centred on the set of a children's television show called "Sweetknuckle Junction." The entire cast of major and minor characters were surprisingly solid on a consistent level; each one had a distinct and off the wall personality. (Hell, they even made the hateful warden from The Shawshank Redemption a loveable engineer.) There's Greg, the shy, impressionable, yet some time uncouth fuzzy rabbit; Jimmy (Green), the loser who goes to work for his producer dad; Gil (Levy), Jimmy's dad, whose shallow, egotistical nature is often overshadowed by the foot in his mouth; Alison (Silverman), the hard-assed executive; Warren "Professor Ape" Montague, the theatre trained pervert; Junction Jack (Gunton), the crusty war veteran; Dottie (Dina Spybey), the slutty, dumb blonde; Tardy, the mentally retarded turtle; and of course, Count Blah, who resembles another famous vampire puppet. Created by Dan Milano (who provided the voices for Greg and Warren), the show specialised in zany, provocative humour with situations many sitcoms would find too cheeky (i.e., Greg replaces a real dog's testicles with plastic singing Sammy Davis Jr. eyes). The DVD contains all 13 episodes, two of which were never aired, as well as a ton of extras. Milano and crew, the actors and even some of the puppets (in character) provide hilarious audio commentary. The featurettes are all quality, especially "Tardy Delivery," in which Tardy must deliver a letter. With plenty of deleted scenes, an episode of the original IFC series and what they call a "Puppet Porn Gallery," this is one of the best compiled, and kept secrets, that really needs to be shared. Plus: wrap reel, puppet auditions, storyboard gallery. (Fox)